Terrarium Tools

 
Terrarium_tools.jpg

In some of the terrariums you attempt, keeping calm whilst trying to squeeze a niggly plant through a tight opening will seem near impossible. Stress levels begin to soar and what should be a moment of serenity and reconnection with nature may instead make you want to throw the whole maddening thing in the bin. 

Overcome such trials and tribulations with a little preparation and a DIY terrarium toolkit, fit for a green-fingered demigod.

 

You Will Need

Long chefs tweezers / Chopsticks (The Picker-Upper)

Straws (The Dirt Blower)

Card / paper funnel (The Dropper-Inner)

Baster / Pipette (The Water-Squirter)

 

For the bamboo stick tools

Steel spoon (The Digger)

Steel fork (The Raker and Moss-Fluffer)

Paintbrush (The Cleaner-Upper)

Blade (The Pruner)

Bored cork or rubber bung (The Soil Compressor)

Sponge / kitchen paper (The Cleaner)

 

Scissors  / aquarium plant scissors

Hollow bamboo

Craft knife

Twine

Pliers

Superglue

 

1. Cut the hollow bamboo to around 30cm (you can usually purchase these pre-cut at your local flower market or garden centre).

2. Slide your tools into the bamboo. Often spoons, forks, paintbrushes and blades will slide straight in, however you may need to split the bamboo if you need a bit of extra give. To do this, take a small craft knife and cut a cross into the end of the tip… there, it should fit better now.

3. To keep tools in place, wrap twine tightly around the bamboo surrounding the tool and tie a knot. Ensure you are forceful with your wrapping. Is the tool secure within the bamboo? There is nothing worse than losing your spoon to the dark depths of a terrarium, then having to create another tool to fish it out.

4. Use pliers to bend fork tines and the spoon bowl to create a rake and spade. As you start using your tools you may want to adjust them to suit your requirements.

5. To make ‘The Soil Compressor’, squeeze a piece of bamboo into the hole of the cork or rubber bung, so that there’s no give. A couple of drops of superglue around the hole should keep it securely in place.

Watch your collection of bespoke tools expand over time… you’ll become used to having to hand whatever you need to access the far-flung corners of your terrarium.